The Voice of the Water – not panicky (Alison Mackenzie)

A white woman in a green, black and white fitted dress kneels in a spotlight on a darkened stage. Her arms are outstretched and her head is flung back in a bold gesture of opening to the world / the audience. In front of her is a bowl of water – some of this has spilled on to the stage floor.
I’m free! - Image Credit: Jassy Earl
A white woman in a green, black and white fitted dress kneels in a spotlight on a darkened stage. Her arms are outstretched and her head is flung back in a bold gesture of opening to the world / the audience. In front of her is a bowl of water – some of this has spilled on to the stage floor.
I’m free! – Image Credit: Jassy Earl

As part of our performance processes I walked down to the river near my house. I took my friends to the river, and I took my dog Rowan. I threw stones into the river for Rowan. I listened to the river and moved with the river. I used the sounds of the river to help me choose the moves I made with the river. Later I used these sounds and these movements in my part of the not panicky performance. I also worked in the performance with water and stones from the river, which I brought on to the stage.

not panicky is a small collective of neurodivergent performers who formed during COVID-19 as part of an ecological performance practice as research project led by Rachel Clive at the University of Glasgow. During the first lockdown the collective worked together outside, witnessing each other’s connections with the rivers and landscapes we live with, sharing stories and exploring strategies for managing anxiety, nurturing positive relationship with both human and nonhuman and experimenting with adaptive performance processes in the time of a global pandemic.