The Usher – Susie Rose Dalton and Esmond Sage

A photocopy of one of the editions of The Usher. In it, we can see the popular R&B and pop star, Usher, with a photoshopped mask, and a regular column called ‘Who Fancies Who’, which invited contributions from people on the people they had seen out and about on their permitted exercise or trips to the shop.
A photocopy of an edition of The Usher, a ‘hyperlocal micropublication’ running for 8 weeks in Leith, Edinburgh, in the first lockdown. Credit: Liminal Residency blog
A photocopy of one of the editions of The Usher. In it, we can see the popular R&B and pop star, Usher, with a photoshopped mask, and a regular column called ‘Who Fancies Who’, which invited contributions from people on the people they had seen out and about on their permitted exercise or trips to the shop.
A photocopy of an edition of The Usher, a ‘hyperlocal micropublication’ running for 8 weeks in Leith, Edinburgh, in the first lockdown. Credit: Liminal Residency blog

The Usher was a ‘hyper-local micropublication’, created during lockdown in an effort to connect people by non-virtual means. It ran for eight issues, inviting and publishing contributions from readers within the Leith, Edinburgh area. Each week, the Usher was placed in six set locations around Leith with a note asking passers-by to pick it up. We received numerous submissions from the public which were published.

https://www.liminalresidency.co.uk/interview-with-hyperlocal-micropub/

Susie Rose Dalton is a contemporary artist. She works mainly with clay though her practice extends to video, performance, and painting, using simple and sensitive ways of working with materials to evoke tender parts of human experience. She is originally from Northern Ireland and has spent most of the last ten years in Scotland.

Esmond Sage is a planner, writer and tenants’ unionist currently based in Aberdeen. He probably takes too much notice of the minute, the banal, and the trivial, but likes to explore what significance they can be stretched to. His work pursues a critical approach to ‘placemaking’ and its purposes. Among other things he is currently working on a review zine of Aberdeen’s chippies.